When Is Weight Loss Too Much, Too Fast?

Career Rescue: You can make yourself stand out in a sea of resumes - Photo

Horn also said she prefers to use a percentage instead of pounds when factoring per-week weight-loss goals. “Healthy weight loss is 1 (percent) to 1 percent of body weight per week. Data tells us that losing more results in a loss of muscle mass,” she said, adding that the rate slows as an individual gets closer to their healthy weight. For the safest weight loss possible – both in terms of losing weight and keeping it garcinia cambogia side effects off – she recommended enlisting the help of a team that includes a medical weight-loss specialist, dietitian, an exercise physiologist and a physical therapist, if necessary.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.chron.com/news/health/article/When-is-weight-loss-too-much-too-fast-5248846.php

A Judgmental Doctor May Make It Hard to Lose Weight

1 stock for 2014, and it’s one of those stocks that could make you rich. You can find out which stock it is in the special free report ” The Motley Fool’s Top Stock for 2014 .” Just click here to access the report and find out the name of this under-the-radar company. Brandy Betz has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends Berkshire Hathaway.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/02/18/can-weight-watchers-stop-losing-big.aspx

Can Weight Watchers Stop Losing Big?

UNC coach Roy Williams often has described how much Meeks has progressed, but Williams said Wednesday that Meeks still has far to go. Meeks was always the biggest kid growing up and hed never been larger than when he arrived at North Carolina in the summer. The 6-foot-9 Meeks weighed 320 pounds. He has since lost more than 30 pounds and is embarrassed to talk about how heavy hed become, but its easier to understand knowing the role food has played in Meeks life. Everybody eats, but not everybody comes from a family that loves to eat as much as Meeks family does.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.newsobserver.com/2014/02/19/3637092/uncs-kennedy-meeks-losing-weight.html

UNC’s Kennedy Meeks: Losing weight, gaining momentum

To come to this conclusion, researchers conducted an Internet survey of 600 overweight and obese adults in the United States who made regular visits to their primary care doctor. “Negative encounters can prompt a weight-loss attempt, but our study shows they do not translate into success,” study author Dr. Kimberly Gudzune, an assistant professor in the division of general internal medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/01/13/idUSnHUGdsQR+73+ONE20140113 Medicine in Baltimore, said in a Hopkins news release. “Ideally, we need to talk about weight loss without making patients feel they are being judged,” she said. “It’s a fine line to walk, but if we can do it with sensitivity, a lot of patients would benefit.” The researchers found that 21 percent of the respondents said they believed their doctor judged them because of their weight.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.philly.com/philly/health/topics/HealthDay685003_20140219_A_Judgmental_Doctor_May_Make_It_Hard_to_Lose_Weight.html

Advertisements

Heavier Dieters Using Diet Drinks Should Look At Food Too, Study Says

Overweight Americans who pick diet drinks eat more food, study finds

Bleich is an associate professor in the Bloomberg School health policy and management department at Johns Hopkins University . She and her colleagues used data about people age 20 and older from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey — a population-based survey that collects information on many health-related topics. The issue is important because the consumption of diet beverages has increased from 3% of adults garcinia cambogia in 1965 to 20% today, and the beverage industry has said it is responding to the obesity epidemic in http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/garcinia-cambogia-extract—crucial-data-released-231403591.html part by producing more low- and no-calorie choices for consumers. A common weight-management strategy is to switch from what are commonly called sugar-sweetened drinks to low- or no-calorie drinks.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sn-diet-beverages-obesity-20140116,0,7402255.story

Diet sodas are losing popularity as more people switch to water, juicing

When you make that switch from a sugary beverage for a diet beverage, youre often not changing other things in your diet, says lead researcher Sara Bleich, associate professor in the department of health policy and management at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Bleich and other Johns Hopkins researchers used data from the 1999-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. For this study, published Thursday in the American Journal of Public Health, they analyzed participants recollection of what theyd had to eat and drink over the past 24 hours. They found that about one in five overweight or obese American adults regularly drinks diet beverages — that includes soda and low-calorie juices, teas and the like — which is about twice the amount that healthy-weight adults are drinking. On the one hand, thats encouraging. People are being told if you need to cut calories from your diet, discretionary beverages are a great place to start, Bleich says. Diet soda consumption has increased steadily since 1965, when just 3 percent of Americans were regularly drinking the stuff, the study authors write. Sales of diet soda actually declined 7 percent last year , but Bleich thinks that just means habitual diet soda drinkers are switching to the many flavored teas, juices and vitamin-enhanced waters currently on store shelves.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.today.com/health/diet-soda-probably-not-going-help-you-lose-weight-2D11940230

Diet soda is probably not going to help you lose weight

A shift in habits When meeting the company’s investors in October, PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi noted that there has been “a fundamental shift in consumer habits and behaviors.” She also said the decrease in popularity of diet drinks has been happening faster than the company initially expected. Industry analysts report that the declining trend was already seen 10 years ago but has become more rapid in the last few years because of the increasing number of health-conscious consumers. Analyst Hester Jeon of IBISWorld published a study on soda use at the end of last year. She says that the drop in diet soda sales can be partially attributed to the growing concerns around processed artificial sweeteners.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.naturalnews.com/043558_diet_sodas_water_juicing.html

In the study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, overweight drinkers of diet beverages in the United States ate 1,965 in food calories a day compared to 1,874 calories among heavy people who drank regular sugar-sweetened beverages. Among obese diet beverage drinkers, those who consumed low- or no-calorie drinks ate 2,058 calories a day in food versus 1,897 food calories for those who had regular drinks, researchers said. Such differences were statistically significant, they added. Lead author Sara Bleich said the results, when paired with other research, suggest that artificial sweeteners may affect people’s metabolism or cravings, although more study is needed. She acknowledged that people could be deciding to eat more since they are saving calories with their diet drinks.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/01/17/overweight-americans-who-pick-diet-drinks-eat-more-food-study-finds/